24
Feb
16

veracity

abuse 55.

I’ve noticed that a few comments have come in saying that the kids’ versions of the abuse they say they’ve suffered at the hands of family members, some of them deceased, never happened. Who can say for sure? Certainly not me.

I wasn’t there. I don’t know the families. I don’t know what the truth is. All I know is that kids are hard-wired not to harm those who are supposed to care for them, and that something pretty remarkable and twisted happened that resulted in violence and death.

Statistically, most kids are to be believed. Not all kids, but most. I am sure that some juvenile parricides concoct stories of abuse as a means of justifying an act of violence and dodging responsibility, but I believe this to be a minority. When a family member comes forward saying that the alleged abuse never happened, they could just as believably be saying, “I don’t come from a family where that could have been happening right under my nose.” Where one’s self-image is involved, denial is as strong a possibility as just believing the kid.

I know several adults who came from families where such abuse happened, but it did not result in parricide. The horrible secret remained well-hidden; other family members never knew or suspected; transgressors never knew how close to death their acts actually took them. I know this is not an insignificant problem. It is more common than most people would like to think.

Especially family members.

abuse1.

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3 Responses to “veracity”


  1. 1 Daryl Watton
    February 24, 2016 at 1:45 pm

    “I know several adults who came from families where such abuse happened, but it did not result in parricide. The horrible secret remained well-hidden; other family members never knew or suspected; transgressors never knew how close to death their acts actually took them. I know this is not an insignificant problem. It is more common than most people would like to think.”

    These very words of yours, Dan, I see quite often in the comments section of online news reports of parricides. They are used to harshly judge the kids who have been convicted and imprisoned in adult jails. The argument is that these parricides are not worthy of support nor redemption because they chose to kill whereas many who suffered the same abuse did not. They question why I write them pen pal letters and send the occasional gift. I have a difficult time answering them because they have a point, don’t they? I’m responding more from an emotional and spiritual place and decide that what I’m doing is the right thing.

    Though I agree that parricides deserve punishment for making this choice and not outright dismissal of any legal charges, across the board I admit that the length and place of imprisonment have not been appropriate for the perpetrators and only abuse them further. Prayers for David Childress, Austin Eversole, the King brothers, and Robert Richardson III (now Robert Siple as he was formally adopted by advocate, now mother, Eileen Siple)

    • February 24, 2016 at 6:26 pm

      I don’t think that they do have a point. Different kids react to abuse in different ways. Just because some kids avoid escalating the seriousness of their situation, this is no reason to judge the “escalators” more harshly. We all have different thresholds of panic and pain.

  2. 3 anonymouse
    February 24, 2016 at 7:37 pm

    Our lives can turn on a moment, on a single decision, and sometimes that decision has the power to change everything. Kids don’t always have the life experiences to help them make the right decisions. No matter what they were taught about right and wrong, it can all get so muddled up when they are overwhelmed by physical and emotional pain, betrayal, fear or even just a sense of survival. So kids sometimes make bad decisions, sometimes horrible and irreversible decisions, but what then?


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